631-423-1010, 421-2690, 549-6700

My friend, I have bought 3 amazing cars from you. I respect your integrity, honesty and loyalty to do the best in your power to provide your friends the best car, exceeding their expectations. Also was impressed the follow up that Doug did with the Daytona, and Janet's persistence to make sure all the shipments were done to my satisfaction.

I know I'm young (comparing to most of your clients), but if I ever want any car, not only a Ferrari, you are the FIRST one I will approach. An example of my trust is that please let the money stay with berlinetta, and we will adjust it to my next purchase.

I thank you (all) for the experince of knowing that there is one company that I can fully trust.

-Cheerag [Dubai, U.A.E.]

PS: my special regards to Janet. -- She's always been very nice to me.

Recommendation Letter from Ron Busuttil

“When asked, ‘ What most impressed me with the car ?’ my answer related to the fact that not only did I purchase the car, but also commissioned modifications solely by telephone.”

-Ron Busuttil, M.D., Ph.D.

"Doug, your reputation is beyond reproach. I have bought several Ferraris in my lifetime, and I know when I buy from you I am buying a car from a reputable person."

-Joe Perella

"The exhaust and engine work you did are spectacular! The car sounds completely wonderful - I can actually hear it swallowing air, and I have no doubt the bad headers were causing all kind of backpressure issues -- the increase in power is kind of breathtaking. Obviously the timing correction has a lot to do with that as well. I feel pretty sure the car runs better than it did when it was delivered new to Sonny Crockett back in 1997. And it sounds like a Ferrari again, not a landscaping truck!"

"The engine compartment is vastly improved as well, and the resurfaced console etc. looks most excellent."

"None of this was cheap, but it was all well worth it. A job really, really well done!"

-Mike Offit




© 2005- J.M. Pirrone

Berlinetta Motorsports Ltd. is an independent enterprise and is not affiliated with Ferrari S.p.A.,Ferrari North America Inc., any club, Ferrari dealer or distributor."

by Carbon McCoy
October, 2008

This Issue's Fun Fact!

Before we begin, I just want to mention that if you're having trouble viewing this text - if it's too small - you can simply make it larger by holding down the control (CTRL) button on your keyboard and scrolling up with your mouse wheel simultaneously. Additionally, you can also make the text smaller with that same process, only scrolling downward with your mouse wheel.

Last issue's Fun Fact and trivia question:

Gear heads pay special attention. Doug Pirrone asks:

"What are 'mouse trap valve springs', when were they used by Ferrari and why? Why did Ferrari stop using them?"

First person to shoot us the correct answer gets a Berlinetta Motorcars baseball cap.

Our winners include: Bill Muno, Mr. Leslie Meek, Randy Simon, Steve Hill and Lance Cremer.

One winner, Randy Simon, had this to say:

"Mouse traps are a type of valve spring used on Ferrari's inside plug motors in the '50s, such as with my early 250 GT PF Coupe.  I replaced them when I rebuilt my motor, because they have a tendency to cause smoke after roughly 10,000 miles.  I assume Ferrari stopped using them for the same reason."

Doug added this to Randy's answer:

Hi Randy:

"Mouse traps are a type of valve spring used on Ferrari's inside plug motors in the '50s. . . "  CORRECT!  What, please, is your address and we will mail a hat?

Additionally, FYI: it is not the mouse trap valve springs or any valve springs that cause the smoking.  It is the soft material that the valve guide were made of combined with the side thrust loads imparted by the mouse trap type spring (as opposed to the coil spring) along with the lack of valve stem seals that exacerbated the reason for smoking.

To answer the trivia question in full:  they were replaced with conventional coils spring because the extra room needed for the mouse trap type spring dictated the use of three studs per cylinder heads, rather than the four stud heads needed when compression ratios evolved higher and higher over the years for more power. What the mouse trap valve springs did afford was higher RPMs, due to less reciprocating mass, as opposed to the coil spring. However, in later years, stronger and lighter spring steel was developed to counteract the normally higher weight of a coil spring.

BTW: This new coil spring material was developed in the good ol' USA.

Best regards,
Doug

Now for this issue's Fun Fact...

This issue features a two-part trivia question, focused around the 275 GTB.

The first question: When did Ferrari go from a short nose 275 GTB to a long nose 275 GTB and why?

The second question: How do you tell from a glance, an alloy-bodied 275 GTB from a steel-bodied 275 GTB?

The first person to answer both questions correctly will receive a Berlinetta Motorcars baseball cap.

Garden State Ferrari Fall Festival 

Garden State Ferrari Fall Festival

You don’t hear much about it – at least not until after it’s already passed. But each year, the Garden State Ferrari Fall Festival puts on a great show. While the cars are judged, the event is not an epic concours in size. But what it lacks in numbers, it more than makes up for in quality. 

Garden State Ferrari Fall Festival

This year’s Fall Festival was held in Florham Park at the Park Avenue Club. All cars judged can only be pre-registered, and the event is an all day affair. Registration and a continental breakfast began at 9am sharp. While I’m the first to support starting the day off by stuffing my face, it was kind of hard to focus on croissants and gourmet muffins when the real decadence was smooth, curvy sheet metal liveried in a rainbow of PPG brilliance. 

Garden State Ferrari Fall Festival

As you might expect, there were a bevy of 308s, 360s and F430s. But Rosso Corsa was in the majority. A Rosso Dino F430 Spider with black leather Daytona seats and orange stitching was a fantastic contrast to a Grigio Alloy 360 Spider with Carta de Zucchero leather. If you were there, your eyes couldn’t help but wander to the white Testarossa, the silver 348 or the light metallic green 400i. Giallo Modena, Mirabeau blue, Argento Metallic – there’s a reason why New Jersey is called the Garden state. 

Garden State Ferrari Fall Festival

The unmistakable Pininfarina curves and precise angles that compose these masterful works of rolling art are a clear indication of why Dave North goes to great lengths to make this the Penn/Jersey Region’s last and most enjoyable event of each season. Even for those of us who have already seen a 599 or a 430 Scuderia or an Enzo – it was nice to see those cars again. Even an F50 that calls Long Island home made the trek down to be displayed. 

Garden State Ferrari Fall Festival

But new age cutting edge seat-of-your-pants thrill rides weren’t the only cars from Maranello that were present. The vintage chapter in Ferrari’s history, whose timeless aestheticism lends itself to endless appreciation, was also open for all to read. Two 330 GT 2+2s – a Series I and a Series II – were on display, along with a 330 GTC. The four headlight 330 2+2, once referred to as the ‘ugly duckling’, seemed to flaunt its metallic gold paint in the sun. It’s a lot of things, but ugly just ain’t one of ‘em. 

Garden State Ferrari Fall Festival

The red Daytona with black seats and red carpets was a stunning specimen representing Ferrari’s iconic V12s from the ‘60s and ‘70s. But the show-stopper – at least in my humblest of opinions – was Stephan Markowski’s white 1961 250 GT Pininfarina Cabriolet (2737 GT). The cockpit was outfitted with tan leather and tan carpets. But the PF Cab’s gorgeously understated lines, coated in Max Meyer Avorio, coupled with a white roof and Borrani wires, set it apart from everything else.  

Garden State Ferrari Fall Festival

My drive home was drenched in the torrid fantasies of piloting the 430 Scuderia I saw at the show. And I’ll see plenty more of those over the years. But a white PF Cab… you just don’t see something like that everyday – even at a Ferrari event. 

Garden State Ferrari Fall Festival

So once again, Dave North executes a flawless and wonderful Fall Festival, bringing the Penn/Jersey Region’s season to a satisfying close. And while I anxiously await the Ferrari-friendly weather of March and April, part of me looks forward to a year from now, when the next Garden State Fall Festival will take place, and I might just see another beautiful vintage Ferrari in an atmosphere conducive to this classy event. 

Garden State Ferrari Fall Festival

Restorations, Part IV  --by Doug Pirrone

This particular article will be a collection of quick tips, gained from solutions to problems that have come up over the years. Hopefully it will also raise some future questions from readers who want to know details about a certain item or problem. 

When sanding “Featherfill”, epoxy primers or other types of spray fill primer surfaces, I have for many decades been block sanding the car with all of the panels on the car, i.e. doors, deck lids, fuel filler doors, etc. This creates the continuous surface of single planes. The resulting surface has the appearance of one surface rather than the sides or hood looking like separate panels. When doors and other panels are sanded off of the car, the sharp edges and definition lines of the panel invariably get rounded off. 

When sanding polyester spray fillers (or Bondo), do not wet sand them. Moisture penetrates the material and can remain trapped under topcoats to fester later as boils and blisters in the paint. Some polyester spray fill manufacturers suggest that their product can be wet sanded, but I do not recommend it. 

Leading is, or was, a lost art. I say “was” because I see a lot more shops using lead again. Our shop has always used it in certain areas because it provides strong corners on panels and is therefore not subject to chipping or breaking, as is the case with Bondo. It also does not get dissolved by paint removers in future strippings. Please note that if you have leaded an area and intend to do more lead work on that area later, do not use metal conditioners. The phosphate coating that remains inhibits the adhesion of more body solder (lead). If the metal is conditioned and more lead work is to be performed, the surface must be cleaned first with vinegar – a mild acid – or a mild solution of mariachis acid. This works pretty well but is not foolproof. This is because of the many little crevices in a typical surface. Sometimes the only solution is to sandblast the surface. 

When priming stripped and glass-beaded magnesium alloy wheels, we have found that epoxy primers – which are also etching primers with good adhesion properties – do not work well. We have repeatedly found that blistering appears. This is because corrosion forms between the epoxy primer and the alloy. Until more facts come to light, I suggest using a good acrylic primer immediately after glass beading. If anyone has found a solution for this problem, I would appreciate hearing from you so that I can pass it along in this column. 

I have found that restoring chrome or alloy rimmed wire wheels (Borrani) that stainless steel spokes are stronger than chrome plated steel spokes. This is due to embrittlement, which occurs in the plating process. They also don’t rust. The strongest wire wheel, however, is one that has painted steel spokes. These are widely used in vintage racing. 

NEVER use copper tubing for brake lines. This is dangerous. The copper appearance on some brake lines is from copper plating of the steel line to prevent, or reduce, corrosion of the tubing. 

For rust-proofing, we have found that Texaco Rustproofing Compound L works extremely well. It is very messy, so we only use it on interior panels such as inside the rocker panels. It will creep in between seams through spot welds by capillary action. On exposed chassis areas you can use a wax/paraffin-based product such as Tuff Kote Dinol. 

I have found that metal items with rubber or plastic attached can be successfully plated with zinc or cadmium. These are pieces such as door latch mechanisms that have  riveted or molded plastic parts, or rubber oil lines with metals ends crimped on. 

Inventory Features

Featured Dinos

This month's Featured Inventory is four-fold.

First, we have a 1973 Dino 246 GTS with the rare factory "Chairs and Flares" package, Campagnolo wheels, sun visors. One of only 95 original 1973 Chairs and Flares cars.  A Dino in great condition with only 25,000 miles from new. Mechanically excellent, handles and drives great. This low mileage, all original Dino would be an excellent candidate for a restoration to Platinum level; to be a truly spectacular "Chairs and Flares" Dino. Additional photos and information can be found here.

1973 Dino 246 GTS

Next we have another 1973 246 GTS, only this one is Blu Scuro. The car has a complete, NEW leather interior with tan Daytona seats and black inserts. The dash is NEWly recovered in proper mouse fur. Full suspension and brake rebuild and detailing. Undercarriage detailing, all NEW bushings, everything painted or plated to proper standards. Very strong engine, beautifully detailed engine compartment, major service & carb rebuild. Full books & tools, including original warranty and delivery book. Roof storage boot, sun visors with suction cups. Concours ready, this is the closest you are going to find to owning a new Dino Spyder. Please ask about our "Berlinetta Warranty" for this car. We put it in writing. For additional pictures of this car, click here.

1973 246 GTS Interior

1973 246 GTS Exterior

Continuing with the Dinos, we have a 1969 246 GT. Beautiful new black paint just completed, new black Daytona seats with red inserts and red carpets. New, rebuilt and detailed suspension; Cromodora knock-off wheels, recent engine out major service, overhauled fuel and cooling systems.  Please ask about our "Berlinetta Warranty" for this car.  We put it in writing. For additional pictures of this car, click here

1969 246 GT Interior

1969 246 GT Exterior

Call today with any questions, or to make an appointment. Click here for more information on this Berlinetta Car.

Lastly, we have this stunning 365 GTB/4-A. Liveried in Fly Yellow, this late model, high performance European production Daytona has an interior outfitted with black leather. A total restoration was done by Berlinetta Motorcars, and it's a Cavallino winner! This car features such pain staking care as a rebuilt and detailed undercarriage and suspension, engine-out under hood detailing, all new chrome and body gaskets and new front and rear glass. She's got incredible paint and just 49,000 original kilometers. Click here to see more pictures of this car.

365 GTB/4-A Interior

365 GTB/4-A Exterior

Please contact a customer indulgence liaison with any questions regarding our inventory.

What is a "Berlinetta Car"?

A "Berlinetta car" is one that has been prepared for sale to the standards established by our shop; it is a reliable mark of quality. Purchasing a car from Berlinetta, you will experience an unparalleled level of quality and service.  Berlinetta's reputation is built on integrity. Purchase with confidence. Whether you drive your car away, or unload it from a transporter, you can expect that your Berlinetta car will be as represented and ready for the road.

Berlinetta's highly regarded reputation and approach toward customer service is a consummate one.  When Berlinetta offers a Ferrari for sale, you're not simply buying a car; you're acquiring the first class example that you've worked so hard to earn.  A select car that is offered for sale is thoroughly serviced and pampered so that you can execute a worry free acquisition.

Berlinetta's reputation is acknowledged and respected by the Ferrari community.  Clients benefit from our ability to source the best examples of the most desirable Ferraris both here and abroad.  Although many cars are advertised, some of the finest cars in private collections are marketed discreetly by private arrangement, so you need to inquire specifically about cars you might desire.  Although advertising generates the most traffic, some sellers have various reasons to offer a car by private treaty, and you may overlook an ideal car if you don't ask widely, or trust us to do it on your behalf.

Additionally, when it's time to sell a car from your own collection, Berlinetta can assure that you get the proper exposure and price in the current market through a widely advertised program or selective confidential presentation to qualified collectors.  If you'd like to receive e-mail updates on cars for sale through Berlinetta Motorcars, please click here.

You will find us to be generous in sharing our knowledge of Ferrari automobiles and the current market.  We are enthusiasts ourselves and are always available to talk cars.  So when you have thoughts of buying or selling, we offer an honest consultation about specific models and their suitability for your collection.  Let us help you navigate the sensitive intricacies involved in finally getting the car you want. Building relationships is our goal, and we hope you will want to build one with us.

FERRARIS WANTED !

We are actively seeking the following Ferraris:

  • GTO (288): Excellent, undamaged example with 5,000-10,000 KM.
  • 275 GTS: Excellent original or restored.
  • 250 GTE: Preferably a project car.
  • 365 GTB/4: Any condition considered.
  • Daytona Spyder Conversion: Excellent condition.

If you have one and are interested in selling it, please contact us at your convenience.

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com
www.BerlinettaMotorcars.com

QUALITY FERRARI CONSIGNMENTS ALWAYS SOUGHT

Please call for consultation on selling a single car or a collection. Your car will receive wide exposure to highly qualified buyers worldwide; or a selective, confidential presentation to qualified buyers and collectors.

The Greatest Driver of the Past, the Present, and the Future 

In Northern Italy, in the province of Mantua, in the Italian region Lombardi, sits a little town called Castel d'Ario, about 150 KM east of Milan. In 1892 Arturo, a motorcycle racer, and his wife Elisa, prepared to have their first child. Little did they know that their son would go on to be the greatest racecar driver the world had ever known. And so, on 16 November of that year, Tazio Nuvolari was born. 

Tazio Nuvolari

Image courtesy kingvigor.com

Later known as the Flying Mantuan, Nuvolari got his motorcycle racing license at the age of 23 in 1915. World War I put Nuvolari's two wheeled speed demon antics on hold, as he served as a driver for the Italian Army. After the war, Tazio resumed racing and, by 1920, even dabbled in racing cars. In 1925, Nuvolari became the 350cc European Motorcycling champion by winning the European Grand Prix at a time when this was considered the most important race of the motorcycling season. Nuvolari went on to the win the Nations Grand Prix four times, and the Lario Circuit five times, all on a Bianchi motorcycle. 

In 1925, Alfa Romeo asked Tazio if he would have a go in their Grand Prix car. The car's gearbox seized and Nuvolari crashed, rolling the car off of the Monza test track and over some barbed wire. Tazio sustained multiple injuries and serious lacerations to his back. The doctors said he'd be okay to go home after a month. But the Nazioni Grand Prix at Monza was only six days away! Nuvolari called his personal doctor in Mantua and gave him instructions on how to manufacture a leather bust. The medical team at the Monza hospital absolved themselves of all responsibility, saying that Tazio Nuvolari was crazy. On the day of the race, Tazio is fitted with his leather bust, covered with a red sweater. Then, driven to the circuit, he's placed on his motorcycle. He looks like a mummy and he can only operate the hand controls. The race is 187 miles long. And it starts to rain. 

Tazio battles it out with two great Englishmen, Simpson and Handley. Handley gives Nuvolari a run for his money but, on the final lap, pushes his bike too much and the engine broke. With an average speed of 80mph - higher than the average speed of the 500cc class - Tazio won the race. He was removed from his bike and promptly fainted. He later made this statement: "...during the last laps, there were some moments where I didn't see the track. I hallucinated and feared to faint; I had to retire I thought. I resisted not for the fear to fall and break my neck. I resisted because I feared that if I turned off the engine, with my heavy bandage and bust, I would risk falling, and remain immobile on the track as a target for my pursuers." This was the first of many myth-like acts executed by Tazio. He was to racing what Salvador Dali was to painting: surreal. 

Tazio Nuvolari

Image courtesy millemigliastory.com

In 1930, Nuvolari won the RAC Tourist Trophy (and again in 1933). He also won the Mille Miglia in 1930, with co-driver Battista Guidotta, in an Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 GS Spider Zagato. Tazio became the first to average a speed of over 62mph in the Mille Miglia, and led the race; despite spending a good portion of it behind his teammate, Achille Varzi. In the middle of the night, at 93mph, Tazio rode right behind Varzi with his headlights turned off for miles. Then, right before the finish in Brescia, Nivoli (as he was called) turned on his headlights and sped past Varzi to win the race. 

Tazio was a big fan of dark humor. Enzo Ferrari gave Nuvolari a round trip ticket to and from the Sicilian Targa Florio and Tazio said, "What a strange businessman you are. What if I am brought home in a coffin?" In 1931, Il Mantovano Volante drove with Giuseppe Campari on the roads of Sicily, training for the Targa Florio. They crashed and, after recovering, Campari called out for Nuvolari but there was no response. Giuseppe feared the worst when he heard a whispering voice. On the other side of the embankment, stretched out in the grass near a tree, there lay Nuvolari, staring intently toward the sky. Tazio said to Campari, "Be quiet! There's a quail's nest with little quails here and you are scaring the chicks!" 

By the end of 1930, Nuvolari decided he would focus only on auto racing in 1931. The '31 season saw a change in regulations that required Grand Prix races to be at least 10 hours in duration. Starting ninth in the Italian Grand Prix, Tazio and his partner Baconin Borzacchini retired their Alfa Romeo with mechanical problems after 33 laps. Tazio then jumped in with Campari and won the race, although he couldn't receive the championship points. The 1932 season saw a revision to the previous season's regulations, changing the length of the races to somewhere between five and 10 hours. Nuvolari drove an Alfa Romeo P3 in which he clinched the championship from Borzacchini by four points. Of the three European Grand Prix, he won two and placed second in a third; he also won the Monaco Grand Prix and a second Targa Florio. 

His mechanic, Paride Mabelli, had this to say about the race: "Before the start, Nuvolari told me to go down on the floor of the car every time he shouts, which was a signal that he went to a curve too fast and that we needed to decrease the car's center of mass. I spent the whole race on the floor. Nuvolari started to shout in the first curve and wouldn't stop until the last one." On April 28th of that year, the famous Italian writer Gabriele d'Annunzio presented Tazio with a golden turtle badge, symbolizing the opposite of Nuvolari's speed. The turtle became his talisman and he wore it ever since. 

The European Championship took a two year hiatus, starting in 1933. So Nuvolari went to compete in the 24 Hours of Le Mans for Alfa, paired up with Raymond Sommer. Sommer said he'd drive the majority of the race because Tazio wasn't familiar with the circuit, and that he'd probably break the car anyway. Tazio retorted by saying that was a leading Grand Prix driver and Le Mans was a simple layout that he could handle. So Raymond backed off and they agreed to share the driving equally. They took a two lap lead before the fuel tank developed a leak - promptly plugged with chewing gum. The chewing gum repair required several more trips to the pits. After that, Nuvolari drove the rest of the race, winning by about 400 yards and breaking the lap record nine different times in the process. 

In 1934, Nuvolari crashed while trying to avoid another car at Alessandria in the Circuito di Pietro Bordino race. He broke his leg, but couldn't deal with the boredom in the hospital. So he entered the AVUS-Rennen, which took place just four weeks after his accident. He drove a specially modified Maserati whose trio of pedals could all be operated by left foot - since Tazio's right foot was still in plaster! Nuvolari ended up finishing in fifth place because of a cramp. 

The following year, Nuvolari hoped to drive for Auto Union, whose only good driver was Achille Varzi. But Varzi didn't want to be on the same team as Tazio, so that only left Ferrari. Enzo turned down Nuvolari because he had previously walked out on the team. But Italian Prime Minister Mussolini intervened and Enzo let Tazio come back. It was in this year, 1935, that the Flying Mantuan scored what is now known today as The Impossible Victory. 

In an old 265hp Alfa Romeo P3, Nuvolari entered the German Grand Prix at the Nürburgring going up against five 375hp Mercedes-Benz W25 racecars, driven by Caracciola, Fagioli, Hermann Lang, Manfred von Brauchitsch and Geyer. Add to that, four 375hp Auto Union Tipo B cars driven by Bernd Rosemeyer, Achille Varzi, Hans Stuck and Paul Pietsch. Under the watchful eyes of the Nazi dictatorship, in front of 300,000 spectators, the 43-year-old Nuvolari - who was just recently in an accident - was prepared to use the Nürburgring's technical difficulty to his advantage: 174 turns in a 17.4 mile-circuit. 

The rain and the race start at the same time. Caracciola takes first and Stuck can't get his car going.  Varzi hits Stuck and has to retire after a few laps. After six laps, the Mercedes are leading the race. Save for Nuvolari and Rosemeyer, all of the Alfas and Auto Union cars are out. The rain stops and Nivola pounces. He goes way beyond the limit, taking advantage in the turns and, by the 11th lap, he's in first place. During a refueling pit stop, Tazio encounters a set back when the petrol pump doesn't work and the car needs to be refilled with drums and a funnel. It seems as though all is lost. But Nuvolari finally gets back out onto the track. By lap 13, Rosemeyer retires with mechanical problems and Caracciola has to slow down afflicted with the same trouble. The Flying Mantuan reaches second place and has von Brauchitsch in his sights. Von Brauchitsch begins to have tire trouble but insists on pushing his car. He knows if he pits, he's done. Tazio sees this weakness in Brauchitsch's car and tries to take advantage of the opportunity. 

Tazio Nuvolari

Image courtesy soldadosgalileo.com

At the last lap, everyone sees Brauchitsch fly by, still in first place, chased by Nuvolari. As the cars race off out of sight, the Third Reich begins preparing for the win. The Nazi flag is hoisted, the German national anthem is ready on the record player and the generals await Brauchitsch with the prize. The white noise of the crowd soon took a back seat to the roaring engines in the distance. The entire crowd stood, squinting through the haze on the long, straight stretch, trying to eyeball the silver racecar. But what they saw instead was red. Alfa Romeo red. Tazio Nuvolari crossed the finish line and won the race. After a long and silent pause, the stunned crowd gave long applause to the Italian victor. The Italian national anthem, lying randomly among the pile of unused records, was pulled and played. The faces of the Third Reich were as red as the winning car. Famous Italian Journalist Montanelli wrote this: While Nuvolari was covered with the laurel of the winner, some thousands of amazed blue eyes were fixed on his exhausted car. They were seeking vainly the technical reasons of that absurd victory. They didn't find it and they found relief in invoking 'der Teufel', the devil. 

Tazio's career continued until 1950. His last race, at age 57, was the Palermo-Montepellegrino hill climb, in which he placed first in class and fifth overall. His relationship with Enzo Ferrari turned sour and, ironically enough, Nuvolari ended up racing for Auto Union once in 1937, and the entirety of the 1938 season. World War II put his career on hold, but he would again turn a wheel in anger after the war. Nuvolari was once asked if he was scared that he might die from the way he races. He asked his inquirer how he wanted to die; "in my sleep" was the reply. So he retorted, "Aren't you scared to go to sleep at night?" 

It was said that Nuvolari wanted to die in the sport he obviously loved so much. But nine months after a stroke, he had another stroke and, oddly enough, died in bed. Nearly the entire town of Mantua attended his funeral; attendance was reported to be between 25 and 55 thousand. Tazio's funeral procession was a mile long and his coffin was placed atop a car chassis that was pushed by Alberto Ascari, Luigi Villoresi and Juan Manuel Fangio. At his request, Nuvolari was buried in his uniform - blue trousers and a yellow jersey. 

With the recent passing of the great Phil Hill, and the retirement of Michael Schumacher, the realization that the era of great racers could be behind us grows all the more vivid. We place great expectations on the likes of Lewis Hamilton and Felipe Massa because of the legends like Tazio that preceded them. But before there were HANS devices, weight-saving carbon fiber and myriad driver aids, pure driving skill was the only thing drivers could bring to the table. And Tazio brought it in spades. 

He's sometimes credited with popularizing the four-wheel drift. A maneuver later adopted by Stirling Moss. To date, three cars have been named in his honor: the Alfa Romeo Nuvola (1996 concept car), the EAM Nuvolari S1 (limited production car announced in 1990 by Edelsbrunner Automobile München adopting 1930s sports car styling) and the Audi Nuvolari Quattro, a concept car that debuted in 2003 and was subsequently integrated into Audi's A5 and S5 lines. Tazio has 61 Grand Prix victories to his name and claimed the checkered flag in places like the Targa Florio, Coppa Ciano, the Vanderbilt Cup (right here on Long Island, New York!), Coppa Acerbo and more. According to legend, when another driver broke the window of a butchery, Tazio drove on the pavement as he past it in an attempt to catch a ham. The name Tazio conjures images of the pinnacle of racing. And when mentioned in the presence of those who actually watched him race, a reverent glint shines in their eyes as they stare off in recollection. But Dr. Ferdinand Porsche summed it up nicely when he called Nuvolari "The greatest driver of the past, the present, and the future." 

Tazio Nuvolari

Image courtesy omea.it

Ferrari Current Events 

So what’s new these days in the world of the prancing horse? Let’s start off on a good note. Rumor has it that Ferrari will soon release an open air version of the 430 Scuderia. The Scuderia Spider – as it has been so far unofficially dubbed – is supposed to hit US shores next spring, and will feature such accoutrements as carbon fiber roll hoops and a solid gold Manettino. Okay, I made that last part up. But precious metals notwithstanding, the Scuderia Spider is supposed to be a limited run (more so than the Scuderia) of which a small percentage will come to North America. Stay tuned for more on this… 

Thomassima

Photo courtesy forum-auto.com

If you don’t know him personally, many of you have at least heard the name Tom Meade. And if you haven’t, then perhaps you’ve heard of the Tommassima. Well, Tom recently spent some time in the hospital due to a broken leg. While laid up eating crumby hospital food, someone stole four Ferrari chassis from Tom’s house in Westwood, California. One chassis was to 250 GTE 2+2 2911 GT, and another was from PF Coupe 1847 GT. The two other chassis, one from a 1965 275 GTS and the other to a 1969 365 GT 2+2, have yet to be identified. We wish Tom well and hope he has a speedy recovery. If you should hear of anything regarding the aforementioned serial numbers, or any stolen chassis, you can contact your local FBI office, or call Tom directly at 310.824.0203. You'll probably reach him more easily in the hospital at 310.478.3711, extension 43048. When he's back on his feet, Tom will get back to working on the Thomassima V. The Thomassima III, seen above, is one of Tom's most stunning projects. The famous GTO-nosed Lusso pictured below, 4383 GT, is another one of Tom's creations.

4383 GT

Photo courtesy samuraiart.com

Pictures of a possible Enzo replacement mule have recently surfaced on the world wide web. They show a modified F430 with large rear wheels and what appears to be a wider rear. While pictures of a test mule aren’t so rare, the seemingly unrelated “copy” of an internal factory letter has been making the e-mail and forum rounds. The letter is from Luca di Montezemolo, and it addresses the Enzo replacement, code named the FX150. Two teens later came forward and admitted they created the document and posted it onto the Internet as a practical joke. They had no idea how quickly it would spread, and it was soon out of control. They issued an apology, but their regrets won’t circle the Internet nearly as quickly as an authentic looking letter revealing intimate details on an upcoming Supercar. 

That’s it for this month. If you know something we don’t, we’d love to be in the loop.

Cavallino Classic

You've read about it; you've seen pictures; maybe you've even been there; John and Alicia Barnes' Cavallino Classic. For almost two decades, The Breakers Hotel in West Palm Beach, Florida, has been host to one of America's premier Ferrari events. From the earliest iterations of Ferrari racing and road cars, to the latest and greatest track and street manifestations to emerge from Maranello, the lawns of the Breakers are littered with the rarest, most beautiful cars the world has ever known. So what does it take to get your car on that grass?

Cavallino Classic

Berlinetta Motorcars has been restoring, maintaining and prepping cars for concours for three decades. Every year, Berlinetta Motorcars is commissioned to look after various Ferraris and tend to the imperfect minutiae that would otherwise be cause for point deduction. The slightest things of which you may or may not be aware are common knowledge here at BMC. A period correct car is essential to bringing home silver, gold, and especially platinum. From hose clamps to valve stems, books and tools to knock-offs, we know exactly how your car left the factory- even if you're unsure. We presented four customer cars at this year's Cavallino Classic. We came home with two major cups- oh, and four Gold Class awards, too.

Berlinetta has already filled spots for the Cavallino Classic XVIII, taking place 20 through 25 January, 2009. We have some spots open and would love to alleviate any concerns you may have about entering this extraordinary event. Call or e-mail us to schedule an appointment, or just lay all of your questions on us right then and there. We'd love the opportunity to show you why we leave Cavallino with awards every year. We're happy, our clients are happy; shouldn't you be happy too? Click here to learn more about our restorations and awards:

http://www.berlinettamotorcars.com/cavallinoclassic.com.htm

http://www.berlinettamotorcars.com/restorations3.htm

http://www.berlinettamotorcars.com/Professional.htm

 

 

 

 

 


In This Issue

Fun Fact

Garden State Ferrari Fall Festival

Restorations, Part IV

Inventory Feature: Exceptional 365 GTB/4, 246 GTS Chairs & Flairs, 246 GTS & a '69 246 GT

The Greatest Driver of the Past, the Present, and the Future

Ferrari Current Events

Cavallino Classic

 

Cars for Sale
631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

1973 365 GTB/4-A

1973 365 GTB/4-A

This Cavallino-winning, European spec Daytona is available now. Check out our featured inventory below for more information.

1973 Dino 246 GTS

1973 Dino 246 GTS

Please see our Inventory Feature below. Rare factory "Chairs and Flairs" package. Photos will be posted to
www.BerlinettaMotorcars.com

1969 246 GT

1969 246 GT

Available September, 2008.
Beautiful, mirror finish NEW spectacular black paint, NEW interior with black Daytona seats complimented by red inserts and red carpets. NEW, rebuilt and detailed suspension, Cromodora knock-off wheels, recent engine-out major service completed, and overhauled fuel system and cooling system.

1973 246 GTS

1973 246 GTS

Available September, 2008. Stunning blue Scuro with NEW tan interior and Daytona seats with black inserts. NEW, rebuilt and detailed suspension, NEW mouse fur dash.

1972 365 GTC/4

1972 365 GTC/4

Restoration photos will be posted to www.BerlinettaMotorcars.com early November. This car is a knock out!

Excellent black paint -- the best color for this model -- NEW black leather and gray carpets, mouse fur dash, and Borrani wire wheels. NEW, rebuilt, and detailed suspension. We love how this car drives; engine is strong and smooth.

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

Who is Berlinetta Motorcars?

Berlinetta Motorcars

Sales, Service, Race Car Prep, Engine Overhauls

  • Pebble Beach
  • Concours d'Elegance Peoples' Choice Concorso Italiano
  • Ferrari Club of America

 

Award Winning Restorations

Since 1979 Berlinetta Motorcars has been servicing, restoring, race-prepping, and customizing automobiles from excruciatingly period correct Ferraris to tricked out Ford Escort Group B Rally track monsters.

As versatile as they are prestigious, BMC can flawlessly execute your needs. From tune-ups to Pebble Beach quality nut-and-bolt restorations, Berlinetta's three decades of passionate dedication is to what Car and Driver magazine is referring when they say:

"Berlinetta Motorcars has earned a reputation for quality work."

As a Ferrari enthusiast, we would like you to add Berlinetta to your trusted resources for information, service, restoration, and assistance in buying or selling cars.

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com
www.BerlinettaMotorcars.com

 

FERRARIS WANTED!!!

We are actively seeking the following Ferraris:

GTO (288): Excellent, undamaged example with 5,000-10,000 KM.

275 GTS: Excellent original or restored.

250 GTE: Preferably a project car.

365 GTB/4. Any condition considered.

Daytona Spyder Conversion: Excellent condition.

If you have one and are interested in selling it, please contact us at your convenience.

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com
www.BerlinettaMotorcars.com

Please call for consultation on selling a single car or a collection. Your car will receive wide exposure to highly qualified buyers worldwide; or a selective, confidential presentation to qualified buyers and collectors.

 

Quick Links

www.BerlinettaMotorcars.com

BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

631.423.1010 / 549.6700

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

631.423.1010 / 549.6700
BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com

 

 







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